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Moodle Task 3: How will reflection help me become a good therapist?

Reflections are a method that many people use to improve their ability to complete a certain task. Therapists constantly use reflective methods for this purpose, which enables more Specific, Measurable, Attainable, Realistic and Timely (SMART) targets. To create a clear goal-directedness for both patient/owner and me the practitioner (Kreucher et al., 2006).

Writing a reflection after an event, by using the Gibbs Reflective Cycle (Gibbs and Coffey, 2000) enables me to make more of an educated decision on the outcome of an event/events (Baird et al., 1991). Reflecting has also been shown to increase academic ability (Travers et al., 2014). Meaning that I will be able to realise where I have made mistakes. Therefore, I will be able to reflect upon this so I can improve the method I will use next time.

This will be especially useful for me while I am studying at university. By using reflection methods, I am able to find the most effective revision techniques, to ensure that I am able to reach my full potential, especially, as the course progresses. By getting into the habit of reflecting on my experiences now, will make it a lot easier in the future, as it will become an ingrained habit (Wallenbert and Jonsson, 2005).

References

Baird, J., Fensham, P., Gunstone, R. and White, R. (1991) ‘The importance of reflection in improving science teaching and learning’. [online] Journal of Research in Science Teaching, 28(2) pp.163-182. [Accessed on 15 March 2017] http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/tea.3660280207/full.

Gibbs, G. and Coffey, M. (2000) ‘Training to teach in higher education: a research agenda’. Teacher Development, 4(1) pp.31-44.

Kreucher, C., Blatt, D., Hero, A. and Kastella, K. (2006) ‘Adaptive multi-modality sensor scheduling for detection and tracking of smart targets’. [online] Digital Signal Processing, 16(5) pp.546-567. [Accessed on 12 March 2017] http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1051200404001204.

Travers, C., Morisano, D. and Locke, E. (2014) ‘Self-reflection, growth goals, and academic outcomes: A qualitative study’. [online] British Journal of Educational Psychology, 85(2) pp.224-241. [Accessed on 17 March 2017] http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/bjep.12059/full.

Wallenbert, I. and Jonsson, H. (2005) ‘Waiting To Get Better: A Dilemma Regarding Habits in Daily Occupations After Stroke’. [online] American Journal of Occupational Therapy, 59(2) pp.218-224. [Accessed on 16 March 2017] http://ajot.aota.org/Article.aspx?articleid=1872083.