1

A Reflection on My Nutrition Presentation

As part of the group presentation, I was set the task of creating a video and packaging for an equine or canine feed. Each group was given a feed at random, where we completed analytical tests to work out the type of feed it was and the group it was targeting. From our results, we were able to work as a group to find out we had a canine weight control feed. This was because the feed was high in fibre and protein leading the dog to feel fuller for longer according to German et al. (2010).

After this stage, we prepared the information we needed to include in the video. To do this we divided up each of the food groups to each member and then shared the information next time we met. We kept it together by using Google Drive, as this helped with organising the information as proven by Dabbagh and Kitsantas (2012).

Completing the task as a group ensured that not only did we learn more about canine obesity-related feeds, but social skills as well. It is known to “sharpen” communication skills, making it easier when we presented the video and answering the questions given to us. This was found out by Petress (2004).

If I had to repeat this or complete a task similar in the future, I don’t think there would be much that I could adapt. Overall, as a group, we worked very efficiently and managed to get it finished well within the time given. Therefore next time, I would ensure that I was able to repeat the management of the task as closely as I could to this one. Not only that, I would ensure I continued to work with people that had the same group work morals as suggested by Johnson and Johnson (1989).

If you are interested in watching my group’s video, please click on the video section on the taskbar. This will take you to a list of videos and the sample video should be near the bottom of the page.

References

Dabbagh, N. and Kitsantas, A. (2012) ‘Personal Learning Environments, social media, and self-regulated learning: A natural formula for connecting formal and informal learning’. The Internet and Higher Education, 15(1) pp.3-8.

German, A., Holden, S., Bissot, T., Morris, P. and Biourge, V. (2010) ‘A high protein high fibre diet improves weight loss in obese dogs’. The Veterinary Journal, 183(3) pp.294-297.

Johnson, D. and Johnson, R. (1989) ‘Social skills for successful group work’. Educational leadership, pp.29-33.

Petress, K. (2004) ‘The benefits of group study’. [online] Education, 124(4). [Accessed on 3 May 2017] http://go.galegroup.com/ps/anonymous?p=AONE&sw=w&issn=00131172&v=2.1&it=r&id=GALE%7CA121765611&sid=googleScholar&linkaccess=fulltext&authCount=1&isAnonymousEntry=true.

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2

A Reflection on My Functional Anatomy Workbook

Thought out this second semester I have been required to complete a workbook for function anatomy about, palpations, the skeleton, joints, tendons and ligaments, nerves and muscles. At first, I was a little unsure about how to go about them. Partly because I didn’t know how much detail was expected of me due to the questions being fairly open. This became easier as I progress through the different sections because I was able to use it to practise my answering technique as stated by Marcus et al. (2013).

However, I did receive formative feedback, but due to the quick turnaround to submit the next section I wasn’t able to utilise it properly. To combat this, a few friends and I gave our submissions to each other to proofread, this also helped to improve the quality of written work. Allen (2015) also states that peer feedback increases work quality.

Despite this, I was anxious about how well I had completed the different sections. The addition of the moodle quizzes helped with this, as these gave virtually instant feedback. As the longer you wait for feedback, the less optimistic you become according to Shepperd et al. (1996).

In order to complete certain aspects, photos were required, which were difficult to obtain. When completing that section of the workbook, I struggled to be able to find the exact photos I wanted. This was due to several reasons. Therefore, next time I would complete all the written parts so that during the practicals, I would make sure that I took the desired photos. I would also ensure that there was a designated photographer so that all the photos were together. As the use of organisation makes it easier to complete a given task more efficiently according to Barker et al. (1990).

References

Allen, D. (2015) ‘Personal and procedural factors in peer feedback: A survey study’. Komaba Journal of English Education, 5 p.47.

Barker, J., Rottman, R. and Ng, M. (1990) ‘Organizing out-of-print and replacement acquisitions for effectiveness, efficiency, and the future’. [online] Library Acquisitions: Practice & Theory, 14(2) pp.137-163. [Accessed on 17 April 2017] http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/0364640890900572.

Marcus, H., Vakharia, V., Kirkman, M., Murphy, M. and Nandi, D. (2013) ‘Practice Makes Perfect? The Role of Simulation-Based Deliberate Practice and Script-Based Mental Rehearsal in the Acquisition and Maintenance of Operative Neurosurgical Skills’. [online] Neurosurgery, 72 pp.A124-A130. [Accessed on 27 April 2017] http://journals.lww.com/neurosurgery/Abstract/2013/01001/Practice_Makes_Perfect__The_Role_of.17.aspx.

Shepperd, J., Ouellette, J. and Fernandez, J. (1996) ‘Abandoning unrealistic optimism: Performance estimates and the temporal proximity of self-relevant feedback.’. [online] Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 70(4) pp.844-855. [Accessed on 17 April 2017] http://psycnet.apa.org/journals/psp/70/4/844/.