A Reflection on My Functional Anatomy Workbook

Thought out this second semester I have been required to complete a workbook for function anatomy about, palpations, the skeleton, joints, tendons and ligaments, nerves and muscles. At first, I was a little unsure about how to go about them. Partly because I didn’t know how much detail was expected of me due to the questions being fairly open. This became easier as I progress through the different sections because I was able to use it to practise my answering technique as stated by Marcus et al. (2013).

However, I did receive formative feedback, but due to the quick turnaround to submit the next section I wasn’t able to utilise it properly. To combat this, a few friends and I gave our submissions to each other to proofread, this also helped to improve the quality of written work. Allen (2015) also states that peer feedback increases work quality.

Despite this, I was anxious about how well I had completed the different sections. The addition of the moodle quizzes helped with this, as these gave virtually instant feedback. As the longer you wait for feedback, the less optimistic you become according to Shepperd et al. (1996).

In order to complete certain aspects, photos were required, which were difficult to obtain. When completing that section of the workbook, I struggled to be able to find the exact photos I wanted. This was due to several reasons. Therefore, next time I would complete all the written parts so that during the practicals, I would make sure that I took the desired photos. I would also ensure that there was a designated photographer so that all the photos were together. As the use of organisation makes it easier to complete a given task more efficiently according to Barker et al. (1990).

References

Allen, D. (2015) ‘Personal and procedural factors in peer feedback: A survey study’. Komaba Journal of English Education, 5 p.47.

Barker, J., Rottman, R. and Ng, M. (1990) ‘Organizing out-of-print and replacement acquisitions for effectiveness, efficiency, and the future’. [online] Library Acquisitions: Practice & Theory, 14(2) pp.137-163. [Accessed on 17 April 2017] http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/0364640890900572.

Marcus, H., Vakharia, V., Kirkman, M., Murphy, M. and Nandi, D. (2013) ‘Practice Makes Perfect? The Role of Simulation-Based Deliberate Practice and Script-Based Mental Rehearsal in the Acquisition and Maintenance of Operative Neurosurgical Skills’. [online] Neurosurgery, 72 pp.A124-A130. [Accessed on 27 April 2017] http://journals.lww.com/neurosurgery/Abstract/2013/01001/Practice_Makes_Perfect__The_Role_of.17.aspx.

Shepperd, J., Ouellette, J. and Fernandez, J. (1996) ‘Abandoning unrealistic optimism: Performance estimates and the temporal proximity of self-relevant feedback.’. [online] Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 70(4) pp.844-855. [Accessed on 17 April 2017] http://psycnet.apa.org/journals/psp/70/4/844/.

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2 thoughts on “A Reflection on My Functional Anatomy Workbook

  1. Hi Eleanor,
    Love your blog. It is very up to date and has a variety of things to look at and I like the way you have used another page for interesting articles you have found. You have used good images and the gallery is a nice addition that gives a bit more insight into what the course is actually like. Your reflections are detailed and I like your use of references. I know that referencing for reflections is quite difficult so it is clear that you have taken lots of time and effort to produce your work. Well done
    Cloe

    Like

  2. Hi Eleanor, your blog is really well illustrated and clear which makes it very user-friendly and appealing. In your reflections you use references very well; they are always relevant and support your writing. This reflection on your workbook is detailed and you link your experiences to how they will help you to improve in the future which is great, well done!

    Like

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